Category: Business & Employment

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Employee Performance Reviews

5 Positive Things You Can Do During Your Employee Performance Review Evaluations

Employee performance reviews are never fun, be they quarterly or annually. Your flaws and mistakes in your work will be pointed out, as well as areas where management wants to see you grow, even if you think you can’t, or their expectations are beyond your natural personality and talents. Still, it’s good to make the most of the situation, whether you want to survive the occasion without too much damage to your confidence or even perhaps shine a little.

Keep reading to learn 6 positive things you can do during your employee performance review to shine bright even when uncomfortable under the microscope of attention.

What kind of cog you are in the larger wheel?

Mention what your direct superiors and subordinates do, as well as mention the responsibilities of your immediate professional acquaintances: Managers, supervisors, and business owners and leaders of all stripes love employees that not only can do a good job in the role they are in but also know where they fit in within the larger organization. When you mention knowledge of the parts those immediately around you play, you show that you understand exactly what kind of cog you are in the larger wheel.

Discuss Goals

Remember the goals set from your hiring or the last round of employment performance reviews: This not only demonstrates that you think of your working here as a career more than just a job, it also is your chance to show that you have grown as an employee. Pointing out how much improvement you’ve made on previous goals can get managers to seriously tone down their criticism.

Suggest goals for yourself: Your performance reviewers will set goals for you if left to their own devices, and they likely already have a few in mind. However, they might not be realistic, or they could just be the same goals they try and challenge everyone to do. If you can, inject a goal or two of your own into the conversation.

Stick to the Facts

Have facts to back yourself up: Anything you can quantify or point out with statistics, be it a conversion rate on prospects, higher attendance, less sick days, or anything else measurable is great to have in your corner. Numbers don’t lie, and while statistics can be twisted and interpreted, they’re always hard to dismiss or argue with.

Show you are ‘Promotion Material’

Illustrate what skills you have that your superiors need in their jobs and daily duties: Even if a performance review feels like something that is looking at your past work, it’s still an analysis of your skills, performance, and experience as an employee. Show your superiors that already have some of what it takes to do higher-level jobs, and they’ll start seeing you as promotion material.

Check out this funny video on performance reviews, guaranteed to make you chuckle!

 

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